Jewel Embroidered Rugs – Zari Embroidered Carpets

Jewel Embroidered Rugs – Zari Embroidered Carpets

 

Rugs are the handknotted carpets used in floring .These are the types of carpets having intricate designs that are are primarily oriental , floral style in a range of colours, sizes and quality.Kashmiri Rugs are handmade, hand-knotted, and are primarily made in pure wool, pure silk and occasionally wool and silk blends. They are available in wide-ranging colors, designs and sizes.Kashmir rugs are primarily made in Srinagar, Kashmir in north India although a significant part of the production also comes from rural Kashmir. Kashmir rugs carry a high premium in the world of handmade, hand-knotted rugs.
Kashmir rugs are made in a range of sizes like 3’x2′, 4’x2’6″, 5’x3′, 6’x4′, 7’x5′, 10’x8′, 12’x9′ and 14’x10′. Due to the intensive labor involved, larger sizes are made only on a custom-order basis.                                                Jewel Embroidered Rugs
Kashmir rugs are renowned to have bright, jewel-like color tones such as sapphire blue, ruby red, emerald green, aquamarine, amethyst, and ivory. Rugs from Kashmir are traditionally made in oriental, floral designs that typically involve the significant and culturally important motifs such as the paisley, chinar tree, (the oriental plane) and tree-of-life. Most of these designs are rooted in the Kashmiri way of living and are a symbolic representation of the age-old Kashmir tradition of hospitality, warmth and genuine love.
It is often said in Kashmir folklore that a home is incomplete without a soul – a Kashmir rug , which is told to “bring the entire house together” into a unified whole.
Rugs are used for a variety of purposes, including insulating a person’s feet from a cold tile or concrete floor, making a room more comfortable as a place to sit on the floor (e.g., when playing with children or as a prayer rug), reducing sound from walking (particularly in apartment buildings) and adding decoration or colour to a room. Rugs can be made in any colour by using differently dyed fibers. Rugs can have many different types of patterns and motifs used to decorate the surface. In the 2000s, carpets are used in industrial and commercial establishments such as retail stores and hotels and in private homes. In the 2010s, a huge range of carpets and rugs are available at many price and quality levels, ranging from inexpensive, synthetic carpets that are mass-produced in factories and used in commercial buildings to costly hand-knotted wool rugs which are used in private homes of wealthy families.                                             Jewel Embroidered Rugs
Rugs can be produced on a loom quite similar to woven fabric, made using needle felts, knotted by hand (in oriental rugs), made with their pile injected into a backing material (called tufting), flatwoven, made by hooking wool or cotton through the meshes of a sturdy fabric or embroidered. Rugs is commonly made in widths of 12 feet (3.7 m) and 15 feet (4.6 m) in the USA, 4 m and 5 m in Europe. Since the 20th century, where necessary for wall-to-wall rug , different widths of Rugs can be seamed together with a seaming iron and seam tape (formerly it was sewn together) and fixed to a floor over a cushioned underlay (pad) using nails, tack strips (known in the UK as gripper rods), adhesives, or occasionally decorative metal stair rods. Wall-to-wall rug is distinguished from carpets or mats, which are loose-laid floor coverings, as wall-to-wall carpet is fixed to the floor and covers a much larger area.
An oriental rug is a heavy textile, made for a wide variety of utilitarian and symbolic purpose, produced in “Oriental countries” for home use, local sale, and export.
Oriental rug can be pile woven or flat woven without pile, using various materials such as silk, wool, and cotton. Examples range in size from pillow to large, room-sized carpets, and include carrier bags, floor coverings, decorations for animals, Islamic prayer rugs (sajjadah), Jewish Torah ark covers (parochet), and Christian altar covers. Since the High Middle Ages, oriental rugs have been an integral part of their cultures of origin, as well as of the European and, later on, the North American culture.
Geographically, oriental rugs are made in an area referred to as the “Rug Belt”, which stretches from Morocco across North Africa, the Middle East, and into Central Asia and northern India. It includes countries such as northern China, Tibet, Turkey, Iran, the Maghreb in the west, the Caucasus in the north, and India and Pakistan in the south. People from different cultures, countries, racial groups and religious faiths are involved in the production of oriental rugs. Since many of these countries lie in an area which today is referred to as the Islamic world, oriental rugs are often also called “Islamic Rug” and the term “oriental rug” is used mainly for convenience.

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